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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:张军勇 大小:b0f22tIZ80748KB 下载:1vUrmeV844348次
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日期:2020-08-07 00:52:35
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Then,' he said, 'if you would finish your voyage and get homequickly, you must offer sacrifices to Jove and to the rest of the godsbefore embarking; for it is decreed that you shall not get back toyour friends, and to your own house, till you have returned to theheaven fed stream of Egypt, and offered holy hecatombs to the immortalgods that reign in heaven. When you have done this they will let youfinish your voyage.'
2.  Thus did they converse [and guests kept coming to the king'shouse. They brought sheep and wine, while their wives had put up breadfor them to take with them; so they were busy cooking their dinners inthe courts].
3.  Ulysses hailed this as of good omen, and Antinous set a great goat'spaunch before him filled with blood and fat. Amphinomus took twoloaves out of the bread-basket and brought them to him, pledging himas he did so in a golden goblet of wine. "Good luck to you," hesaid, "father stranger, you are very badly off at present, but Ihope you will have better times by and by."
4.  And Jove said, "My child, what are you talking about? How can Iforget Ulysses than whom there is no more capable man on earth, normore liberal in his offerings to the immortal gods that live inheaven? Bear in mind, however, that Neptune is still furious withUlysses for having blinded an eye of Polyphemus king of theCyclopes. Polyphemus is son to Neptune by the nymph Thoosa, daughterto the sea-king Phorcys; therefore though he will not kill Ulyssesoutright, he torments him by preventing him from getting home.Still, let us lay our heads together and see how we can help him toreturn; Neptune will then be pacified, for if we are all of a mindhe can hardly stand out against us."
5.  BOOK XXI.
6.  "Menelaus," replied Telemachus, "I want to go home at once, for whenI came away I left my property without protection, and fear that whilelooking for my father I shall come to ruin myself, or find thatsomething valuable has been stolen during my absence."

计划指导

1.  But King Neptune, who was returning from the Ethiopians, caughtsight of Ulysses a long way off, from the mountains of the Solymi.He could see him sailing upon the sea, and it made him very angry,so he wagged his head and muttered to himself, saying, heavens, so thegods have been changing their minds about Ulysses while I was awayin Ethiopia, and now he is close to the land of the Phaeacians,where it is decreed that he shall escape from the calamities that havebefallen him. Still, he shall have plenty of hardship yet before hehas done with it."
2.  "Very well," replied Telemachus, "go home when you have had yourdinner, and in the morning come here with the victims we are tosacrifice for the day. Leave the rest to heaven and me."
3.  "Therefore, Sir, do you on your part affect no more concealmentnor reserve in the matter about which I shall ask you; it will be morepolite in you to give me a plain answer; tell me the name by whichyour father and mother over yonder used to call you, and by whichyou were known among your neighbours and fellow-citizens. There isno one, neither rich nor poor, who is absolutely without any namewhatever, for people's fathers and mothers give them names as soonas they are born. Tell me also your country, nation, and city, thatour ships may shape their purpose accordingly and take you there.For the Phaeacians have no pilots; their vessels have no rudders asthose of other nations have, but the ships themselves understandwhat it is that we are thinking about and want; they know all thecities and countries in the whole world, and can traverse the sea justas well even when it is covered with mist and cloud, so that thereis no danger of being wrecked or coming to any harm. Still I doremember hearing my father say that Neptune was angry with us forbeing too easy-going in the matter of giving people escorts. He saidthat one of these days he should wreck a ship of ours as it wasreturning from having escorted some one, and bury our city under ahigh mountain. This is what my used to say, but whether the god willcarry out his threat or no is a matter which he will decide forhimself.
4.  Minerva answered, "Stranger, you must be very simple, or must havecome from somewhere a long way off, not to know what country thisis. It is a very celebrated place, and everybody knows it East andWest. It is rugged and not a good driving country, but it is by nomeans a bid island for what there is of it. It grows any quantity ofcorn and also wine, for it is watered both by rain and dew; itbreeds cattle also and goats; all kinds of timber grow here, and thereare watering places where the water never runs dry; so, sir, thename of Ithaca is known even as far as Troy, which I understand tobe a long way off from this Achaean country."
5.  To this Ulysses answered, "Amphinomus, you seem to be a man ofgood understanding, as indeed you may well be, seeing whose son youare. I have heard your father well spoken of; he is Nisus ofDulichium, a man both brave and wealthy. They tell me you are his son,and you appear to be a considerable person; listen, therefore, andtake heed to what I am saying. Man is the vainest of all creaturesthat have their being upon earth. As long as heaven vouchsafes himhealth and strength, he thinks that he shall come to no harmhereafter, and even when the blessed gods bring sorrow upon him, hebears it as he needs must, and makes the best of it; for GodAlmighty gives men their daily minds day by day. I know all aboutit, for I was a rich man once, and did much wrong in thestubbornness of my pride, and in the confidence that my father andmy brothers would support me; therefore let a man fear God in allthings always, and take the good that heaven may see fit to send himwithout vainglory. Consider the infamy of what these suitors aredoing; see how they are wasting the estate, and doing dishonour to thewife, of one who is certain to return some day, and that, too, notlong hence. Nay, he will be here soon; may heaven send you homequietly first that you may not meet with him in the day of his coming,for once he is here the suitors and he will not part bloodlessly."
6.  "Eurymachus," Penelope answered, "people who persist in eating upthe estate of a great chieftain and dishonouring his house must notexpect others to think well of them. Why then should you mind if mentalk as you think they will? This stranger is strong and well-built,he says moreover that he is of noble birth. Give him the bow, andlet us see whether he can string it or no. I say- and it shallsurely be- that if Apollo vouchsafes him the glory of stringing it,I will give him a cloak and shirt of good wear, with a javelin to keepoff dogs and robbers, and a sharp sword. I will also give him sandals,and will see him sent safely whereever he wants to go."

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1.  "I have come, sir replied Telemachus, "to see if you can tell meanything about my father. I am being eaten out of house and home; myfair estate is being wasted, and my house is full of miscreants whokeep killing great numbers of my sheep and oxen, on the pretence ofpaying their addresses to my mother. Therefore, I am suppliant at yourknees if haply you may tell me about my father's melancholy end,whether you saw it with your own eyes, or heard it from some othertraveller; for he was a man born to trouble. Do not soften thingsout of any pity for myself, but tell me in all plainness exactlywhat you saw. If my brave father Ulysses ever did you loyal serviceeither by word or deed, when you Achaeans were harassed by theTrojans, bear it in mind now as in my favour and tell me truly all."
2.  "Then I said, 'I wish I could be as sure of killing you outright andsending you down to the house of Hades, as I am that it will take morethan Neptune to cure that eye of yours.'
3.  Ulysses was glad at finding himself, as Minerva told him, in his owncountry, and he began to answer, but he did not speak the truth, andmade up a lying story in the instinctive wiliness of his heart.
4.  "How sad," exclaimed Telemachus, "that all this was of no avail tosave him, nor yet his own iron courage. But now, sir, be pleased tosend us all to bed, that we may lie down and enjoy the blessed boon ofsleep."
5.   "When I heard him I was in two minds whether or no to draw thekeen blade that hung by my sturdy thigh and cut his head off inspite of his being a near relation of my own; but the men intercededfor him and said, 'Sir, if it may so be, let this fellow stay here andmind the ship, but take the rest of us with you to Circe's house.'
6.  "The queen is preparing for her marriage with one or other of us.Little does she dream that her son has now been doomed to die."

应用

1.  Ulysses went back to his own place, and Eumaeus strewed some greenbrushwood on the floor and threw a sheepskin on top of it forTelemachus to sit upon. Then the swineherd brought them platters ofcold meat, the remains from what they had eaten the day before, and hefilled the bread baskets with bread as fast as he could. He mixed winealso in bowls of ivy-wood, and took his seat facing Ulysses. Then theylaid their hands on the good things that were before them, and as soonas they had had enough to eat and drink Telemachus said to Eumaeus,"Old friend, where does this stranger come from? How did his crewbring him to Ithaca, and who were they?-for assuredly he did notcome here by land"'
2.  "Then,' he said, 'if you would finish your voyage and get homequickly, you must offer sacrifices to Jove and to the rest of the godsbefore embarking; for it is decreed that you shall not get back toyour friends, and to your own house, till you have returned to theheaven fed stream of Egypt, and offered holy hecatombs to the immortalgods that reign in heaven. When you have done this they will let youfinish your voyage.'
3.  Noemon then went back to his father's house, but Antinous andEurymachus were very angry. They told the others to leave off playing,and to come and sit down along with themselves. When they came,Antinous son of Eupeithes spoke in anger. His heart was black withrage, and his eyes flashed fire as he said:
4、  "Mentor," answered Telemachus, "do not let us talk about it anymore. There is no chance of my father's ever coming back; the godshave long since counselled his destruction. There is something else,however, about which I should like to ask Nestor, for he knows muchmore than any one else does. They say he has reigned for threegenerations so that it is like talking to an immortal. Tell me,therefore, Nestor, and tell me true; how did Agamemnon come to diein that way? What was Menelaus doing? And how came false Aegisthusto kill so far better a man than himself? Was Menelaus away fromAchaean Argos, voyaging elsewhither among mankind, that Aegisthus tookheart and killed Agamemnon?"
5、  But Minerva would not let the suitors for one moment drop theirinsolence, for she wanted Ulysses to become still more bitteragainst them. Now there happened to be among them a ribald fellow,whose name was Ctesippus, and who came from Same. This man,confident in his great wealth, was paying court to the wife ofUlysses, and said to the suitors, "Hear what I have to say. Thestranger has already had as large a portion as any one else; this iswell, for it is not right nor reasonable to ill-treat any guest ofTelemachus who comes here. I will, however, make him a present on myown account, that he may have something to give to the bath-woman,or to some other of Ulysses' servants."

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  • 柳庆庆 08-06

      "These two," continued Ulysses, "will not keep long out of the fray,when the suitors and we join fight in my house. Now, therefore, returnhome early to-morrow morning, and go about among the suitors asbefore. Later on the swineherd will bring me to the city disguisedas a miserable old beggar. If you see them ill-treating me, steel yourheart against my sufferings; even though they drag me feet foremostout of the house, or throw things at me, look on and do nothing beyondgently trying to make them behave more reasonably; but they will notlisten to you, for the day of their reckoning is at hand.Furthermore I say, and lay my saying to your heart, when Minerva shallput it in my mind, I will nod my head to you, and on seeing me do thisyou must collect all the armour that is in the house and hide it inthe strong store room. Make some excuse when the suitors ask you whyyou are removing it; say that you have taken it to be out of the wayof the smoke, inasmuch as it is no longer what it was when Ulysseswent away, but has become soiled and begrimed with soot. Add to thismore particularly that you are afraid Jove may set them on toquarrel over their wine, and that they may do each other some harmwhich may disgrace both banquet and wooing, for the sight of armssometimes tempts people to use them. But leave a sword and a spearapiece for yourself and me, and a couple oxhide shields so that we cansnatch them up at any moment; Jove and Minerva will then soon quietthese people. There is also another matter; if you are indeed my sonand my blood runs in your veins, let no one know that Ulysses iswithin the house- neither Laertes, nor yet the swineherd, nor any ofthe servants, nor even Penelope herself. Let you and me exploit thewomen alone, and let us also make trial of some other of the menservants, to see who is on our side and whose hand is against us."

  • 蒙少祥 08-06

      "But the cruel wretch said, 'Then I will eat all Noman's comradesbefore Noman himself, and will keep Noman for the last. This is thepresent that I will make him.'

  • 金某某 08-06

       Thus did they converse; meanwhile Melanthius the goatherd came up,for he too was bringing in his best goats for the suitors' dinner; andhe had two shepherds with him. They tied the goats up under thegatehouse, and then Melanthius began gibing at Ulysses. "Are you stillhere, stranger," said he, "to pester people by begging about thehouse? Why can you not go elsewhere? You and I shall not come to anunderstanding before we have given each other a taste of our fists.You beg without any sense of decency: are there not feasts elsewhereamong the Achaeans, as well as here?"

  • 巴萨 08-06

      "I am very much distressed," said Telemachus, "by what you have justtold me. How can I take this stranger into my house? I am as yetyoung, and am not strong enough to hold my own if any man attacksme. My mother cannot make up her mind whether to stay where she is andlook after the house out of respect for public opinion and thememory of her husband, or whether the time is now come for her to takethe best man of those who are wooing her, and the one who will makeher the most advantageous offer; still, as the stranger has come toyour station I will find him a cloak and shirt of good wear, with asword and sandals, and will send him wherever he wants to go. Or ifyou like you can keep him here at the station, and I will send himclothes and food that he may be no burden on you and on your men;but I will not have him go near the suitors, for they are veryinsolent, and are sure to ill-treat him in a way that would greatlygrieve me; no matter how valiant a man may be he can do nothingagainst numbers, for they will be too strong for him."

  • 陈汉沟 08-05

    {  "'Sir,' he answered with a groan, 'it was all bad luck, and my ownunspeakable drunkenness. I was lying asleep on the top of Circe'shouse, and never thought of coming down again by the great staircasebut fell right off the roof and broke my neck, so my soul down tothe house of Hades. And now I beseech you by all those whom you haveleft behind you, though they are not here, by your wife, by the fatherwho brought you up when you were a child, and by Telemachus who is theone hope of your house, do what I shall now ask you. I know thatwhen you leave this limbo you will again hold your ship for the Aeaeanisland. Do not go thence leaving me unwaked and unburied behind you,or I may bring heaven's anger upon you; but burn me with whateverarmour I have, build a barrow for me on the sea shore, that may tellpeople in days to come what a poor unlucky fellow I was, and plantover my grave the oar I used to row with when I was yet alive and withmy messmates.' And I said, 'My poor fellow, I will do all that youhave asked of me.'

  • 妮可·基德曼 08-04

      Thus did he speak, and the others applauded his saying; they thenall of them went inside the buildings.}

  • 何会文 08-04

      "Stockman," answered Ulysses, "you seem to be a very well-disposedperson, and I can see that you are a man of sense. Therefore I willtell you, and will confirm my words with an oath: by Jove, the chiefof all gods, and by that hearth of Ulysses to which I am now come,Ulysses shall return before you leave this place, and if you are sominded you shall see him killing the suitors who are now mastershere."

  • 李发芽 08-04

      "Maids, servants of Ulysses who has so long been absent, go to thequeen inside the house; sit with her and amuse her, or spin, andpick wool. I will hold the light for all these people. They may staytill morning, but shall not beat me, for I can stand a great deal."

  • 彭延钧 08-03

       "If you are Ulysses," said he, "then what you have said is just.We have done much wrong on your lands and in your house. ButAntinous who was the head and front of the offending lies low already.It was all his doing. It was not that he wanted to marry Penelope;he did not so much care about that; what he wanted was something quitedifferent, and Jove has not vouchsafed it to him; he wanted to killyour son and to be chief man in Ithaca. Now, therefore, that he hasmet the death which was his due, spare the lives of your people. Wewill make everything good among ourselves, and pay you in full for allthat we have eaten and drunk. Each one of us shall pay you a fineworth twenty oxen, and we will keep on giving you gold and bronze tillyour heart is softened. Until we have done this no one can complain ofyour being enraged against us."

  • 瓦力 08-01

    {  "Aldermen and town councillors of the Phaeacians, hear my words. Youhave had your supper, so now go home to bed. To-morrow morning I shallinvite a still larger number of aldermen, and will give asacrificial banquet in honour of our guest; we can then discuss thequestion of his escort, and consider how we may at once send himback rejoicing to his own country without trouble or inconvenienceto himself, no matter how distant it may be. We must see that he comesto no harm while on his homeward journey, but when he is once athome he will have to take the luck he was born with for better orworse like other people. It is possible, however, that the stranger isone of the immortals who has come down from heaven to visit us; but inthis case the gods are departing from their usual practice, forhitherto they have made themselves perfectly clear to us when wehave been offering them hecatombs. They come and sit at our feastsjust like one of our selves, and if any solitary wayfarer happens tostumble upon some one or other of them, they affect no concealment,for we are as near of kin to the gods as the Cyclopes and the savagegiants are."

  • 威福 08-01

      "That night we rested and nursed our anger, for Jove was hatchingmischief against us. But in the morning some of us drew our ships intothe water and put our goods with our women on board, while the rest,about half in number, stayed behind with Agamemnon. We- the otherhalf- embarked and sailed; and the ships went well, for heaven hadsmoothed the sea. When we reached Tenedos we offered sacrifices to thegods, for we were longing to get home; cruel Jove, however, did notyet mean that we should do so, and raised a second quarrel in thecourse of which some among us turned their ships back again, andsailed away under Ulysses to make their peace with Agamemnon; but I,and all the ships that were with me pressed forward, for I saw thatmischief was brewing. The son of Tydeus went on also with me, andhis crews with him. Later on Menelaus joined us at Lesbos, and foundus making up our minds about our course- for we did not know whetherto go outside Chios by the island of Psyra, keeping this to ourleft, or inside Chios, over against the stormy headland of Mimas. Sowe asked heaven for a sign, and were shown one to the effect that weshould be soonest out of danger if we headed our ships across the opensea to Euboea. This we therefore did, and a fair wind sprang upwhich gave us a quick passage during the night to Geraestus, wherewe offered many sacrifices to Neptune for having helped us so far onour way. Four days later Diomed and his men stationed their ships inArgos, but I held on for Pylos, and the wind never fell light from theday when heaven first made it fair for me.

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