0 新棋牌娱乐平台-APP安装下载

新棋牌娱乐平台 注册最新版下载

新棋牌娱乐平台 注册

新棋牌娱乐平台注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:亓孝伟 大小:e3891EZn37375KB 下载:qB5EzYmS30351次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:6Pgrfyqo62216条
日期:2020-08-04 20:16:28
安卓
李文琦

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  THE FIFT DAY, THE FOURTH NOVELL
2.  So soone as the Tables were withdrawne, Thorello knowing theymight be weary, brought them againe to their Chambers, wherecommitting them to their good rest, himselfe went to bed sooneafter. The Servant sent to Pavia, delivered the message to his Lady;who, not like a woman of ordinary disposition, but rather truelyRoyall, sent Thorelloes servants into the City, to make preparationfor a Feast indeed, and with lighted Torches (because it wassomewhat late) they invited the very greatest and noblest persons ofthe Citie, all the roomes being hanged with the richest Arras, Clothesand Golde worke, Velvets, Silkes, and all other rich adornments, insuch manner as her husband had commanded, and answerable to her owneworthy mind, being no way to learne, in what manner to entertainestrangers.
3.  Sayling on prosperously in our Ship, it was not long before wearrived at Baga, where being landed, and not knowing any person,neither what I should say to the Gentlemen, who onely were carefullfor delivering me to my Father, according as they were charged bythe reverend Abbesse: it was the will of heaven doubtlesse (in pittyand compassion of my passed disasters) that I was no sooner come onshore at Baffa, but I should there haply meet with Antigonus, whom Icalled unto in our Country language because I would not beunderstood by the Gentlemen nor their wives, requesting him toacknowledge me as his daughter. Quickly he apprehended mine intention,accomplishing what requested, and (according to his poore power)most bounteously feasted the Gentlemen and their wives, conductingme to the King of Cyprus, who received me royally, and sent me home toyou with so much honour, as I am no way able to relate. What elseretnaineth to be said, Antigonus who hath oft heard the whole story ofmy misfortunes, at better leysure will report.
4.  Falling from one discourse to another, they beganne to talke of suchprayers, as men (in journey) use to salute God withall; and one of theTheeves (they being three in number) spake thus to Rinaldo. Sir, letit be no offence to you, that I desire to know, what prayer you mostuse when thus you travell on the way? Whereto Rinaldo replyed inthis manner. To tell you true Sir, I am a man grosse enough in suchDivine matters, as medling more with Merchandize, then I do withBookes. Neverthelesse, at all times when I am thus in journey, inthe morning before I depart my Chamber, I say a Pater noster, and anAve Maria for the soules of the father and mother of Saint Julian; andafter that, I pray God and S. Julian to send me a good lodging atnight. And let me tell you Sir, that very oftentimes heeretofore, Ihave met with many great dangers upon the way, from all which Istill escaped, and evermore (when night drew on) I came to anexceeding good Lodging. Which makes mee firmely beleeve, that SaintJulian (in honour of whom I speake it) hath beggd of God such greatgrace for me; and mee thinkes, that if any day I should faile ofthis prayer in the morning: I cannot travaile securely, nor come toa good lodging. No doubt then Sir (quoth the other) but you have saidethat prayer this morning? I would be sory else, said Rinaldo, suchan especiall matter is not to be neglected.
5.  But why doe I trouble my selfe, in talking thus of our so latelyconverted Friar, holy Father Reynard, when they of longer standing,and reputed meerely for Saints in life, are rather much more vile thenhee? Such is the wretched condition of this world, that they shame not(fat, foggie, and nastie Abbey-lubbers) to shew how full-fedde theylive in their Cloysters, with cherry cheekes, and smooth shininglookes, gay and gaudy garments, far from the least expression ofhumility, not walking in the streets like Doves: but high-crested likeCockes, with well cramd gorges. Nay, which is worse, if you did butsee their Chambers furnished with Gally-pots of Electuaries,precious Unguents, Apothecary Boxes, filled with variousConfections, Conserves, excellent Perfumes, and other goodly Glassesof artificiall Oyles and Waters: beside Rundlets and small Barrelsfull of Greeke Wine, Muscatella, Lachrime Christi, and other such likemost precious Wines, so that (to such as see them) they seeme not tobee Chambers of Religious men; but rather Apothecaries Shoppes, orappertaining to Druggists, Grocers, or Perfumers.
6.  By our greatest Gods, I never met with any man, more compleat in allnoble perfections, more courteous and kinde then Thorello is. If allthe Christian Kings, in the true and heroicall nature of Kings, dodeale as honourably as I see this Knight doeth, the Soldane of Babylonis not able to endure the comming of one of them, much lesse somany, as wee see preparing to make head against us. But beholding,that both refusall and acceptation, was all one in the minde ofThorello: after much kinde Language had bin intercoursed betweenethem, Saladine (with his Attendants) mounted on horsebacke.

计划指导

1.  But, as excesse of delight is the Nurse to negligence, and begettethsuch an overpresuming boldnesse, as afterward proveth to be saucedwith repentance: so came it to passe with our over-fond Lovers, inbeing taken tardy through their owne folly. After they had manytimes met in this manner, the nights (according to the season) growingshorter and shorter, which their stolne delight made them lesserespective of, then was requisite in an adventure so dangerous: itfortuned, that their amorous pleasure had so farre transported them,and dulled their senses in such sort, by these their continuallnightly watchings; that they both fell fast asleepe, he having hishand closed in hers, and she one arme folded about his body, andthus they slept till broade day light. Old Messer Lizio, whocontinually was the morning Cocke to the whole House, going foorthinto his Garden, saw how his Daughter and Ricciardo were seated at thewindow. In he went againe, and going to his wives Chamber, saide toher. Rise quickly wife, and you shall see, what made your Daughterso desirous to lodge in the Garden Gallery. I perceive that shee lovedto heare the Nightingale, for she hath caught one, and holds himfast in her hand. Is it possible, saide the Mother, that ourDaughter should catch a live Nightingale in the darke? You shall seethat your selfe, answered Messer Lizio, if you will make hast, andgo with me.She, putting on her garments in great haste, followed her Husband,and being come to the Gallery doore, he opened it very softly, andgoing to the window, shewed her how they both sate fast asleepe, andin such manner as hath bene before declared: whereupon, sheeperceiving how Ricciardo and Catharina had both deceived her, wouldhave made an outcry, but that Messer Lizio spake thus to her. Wife, asyou love me, speake not a word, neither make any noyse: for, seeingshee hath loved Ricciardo without our knowledge, and they have hadtheir private meetings in this manner, yet free from any blamefuimputation; he shall enjoy her, and she him. Ricciardo is a Gentleman,well derived, and of rich possessions, it can be no disparagement tous, that Catharina match with him in mariage, which he neithershall, or dare deny to do, in regard of our Lawes severity; forclimbing up to my window with his Ladder of Ropes, whereby his life isforfeited to the Law, except our Daughter please to spare it, as itremaineth in her power to doe, by accepting him as her husband, oryeelding his life up to the Law, which surely she will not suffer,their love agreeing together in such mutuall manner, and headventuring so dangerously for her. Madam Jaquemina, perceiving thather husband spake very reasonably, and was no more offended at thematter; stept side with him behinde the drawne Curtaines, untillthey should awake of themselves. At the last, Ricciardo awaked, andseeing it was so farre in the day, thought himselfe halfe dead, andcalling to Catharina, saide.
2.  I am sure Andrea, that you greatly marvell at me, in gracing youwith this solemne and kinde entertainment, and why I should so melt myselfe in sighes and teares, at a man that hath no knowledge of mee, orperhaps, sildome or never heard any speeches of mee: but you shallinstantly receive from mee matter to augment your greater marvaile,meeting heere with your owne Sister, beyond all hope or expectation ineyther of us both. But seeing that Heaven hath beene so gracious tome, to let mee see one of my Brethren before I dye (though gladly Iwould have seene them all) which is some addition of comfort to me,and that which (happily) thou hast never heard before, in plaine andtruest manner, I will reveale unto thee.
3.  But,
4.  Thoughts, have you lost your quiet silent sleeping.
5.  WHEREBY PLAINLY APPEARETH, THAT A SODAINE WITTY AND MERRY ANSWER,
6.  Faire Ladies, the paltry Judge of the Marquisate, whereofyesterday I made relation to you; hindred mee then of anotherNovell, concerning silly Calandrino, wherewith I purpose now toacquaint you. And because whatsoever hath already bin spoken of him,tended to no other end but matter of meriment, hee and hiscompanions duly considered; the Novel which I shal now report, keepethwithin the selfesame compasse, and aimeth also at your contentment,according to the scope of imposed variety.

推荐功能

1.  Ricciardo not unacquainted with this her jealous humour, as wellby credible hearing thereof, as also by daily observation, began towith himselfe, that it were best to consider for him, to dissembleamorous affection in some other place, and (henceforward) to set asideall hope, of ever enjoying the love of Madam Catulla, because he wasnow become the servant to another Gentlewoman, pretending (in herhonour) to performe many worthy actions of Armes, Joustes,Tournaments, and all such like noble exercises, as he was wont todoe for Madam Catulla. So that most of the people of Naples, butespecially Madam Catulla, becam perswaded, that his formerfruitlesse love to her was quite changed, and the new elected Lady hadall the glory of his best endevours, persevering so long in thisopinion, as now it passed absolutely for currant. Thus seemed he nowas meere a stranger to her, whose house before he familiarlyfrequented, yet as a neighbour gave her the daies salutations,according as he chanced to see her, or meet her.
2.  If I be poasted off, and may not prove,
3.  I found like faith, as manly minde I know;
4.  All wrapt up in a cloath most fine.
5.   An especiall time being appointed, when this amorous Combateshould be fought in loves field, Friar Reynard came to his Gossipshouse, where none being present to hinder his purpose, but onely theNursse which attended on the child, who was an indifferent faire andproper woman: his holy brother that came thither in his company(because Friars were not allowed to walke alone) was sent aside withher into the Pigeon loft, to enstruct her in a new kinde of Paternoster, lately devised in their holy Convent. In the meane while, asFriar Reynard and Agnesia were entring into hir chamber, she leadingher little son by the hand, and making fast the doore for their bettersafety: the Friar laide by his holie habit, Cowle, Hood, Booke, andBeads, to bee (in all respects) as other men were. No sooner were theythus entred the Chamber, but her husband Credulano, being come intothe house, and unseen of any, staid not till he was at the Chamberdoore, where hee knockt, and called for his Wife.
6.  Which tydings comming to the hearing of Signior Gentile, by one thatwas his endeared friend: Although (while she lived) he could neverbe gracious n her favour, yet her so sudden death did greatly grievehim, whereupon he discoursed in this sort with himselfe. DeareMadame Catharina, I am not a little sorry for thy death, although(during thy life-time) I was scarcely worthy of one kind looke: Yetnow being dead, thou canst not prohibite me, but I may robbe thee of akisse. No sooner had hee spoke the words, but it beeing then night,and taking such order, as none might know of his departure: heemounted on horsebacke, accompanied onely with one servant, andstayed no where, till hee came to the vault where the Lady was buried.Which when he had opened, with instruments convenient for the purpose,he descended downe into the vault, and kneeled downe by the Beerewhereon she lay, and in her wearing garments, according to theusuall manner; with teares trickling mainly downe his cheekes, hebestowed infinite sweet kisses on her.

应用

1.  These words were highly pleasing to the holy Friar, and seemed tohim as an argument of a good conscience: Wherefore, after hee had muchcommended this forwardnesse in him, he began to demand of him if hehad never offended with any Woman? Whereunto master Chappelet(breathing forth a great sigh) answered.
2.  Calandrino committing all these things to respective memory, andpretending to be called thence by some other especiall affaires;departed from Maso, concluding resolvedly with himselfe, to finde thisprecious stone, if possibly hee could: yet intending to doe nothing,untill hee had acquainted Bruno and Buffalmaco therewith, whom heloved dearly: he went in all hast to seeke them; because, (without anylonger trifling the time) they three might bee the first men, thatshould find out this precious stone, spending almost the whole morningbefore they were all three met together. For they were painting at theMonastery of the Sisters of Faenza, where they had very seriousimployment, and followed their businesse diligently: where havingfound them, and saluting them in such kinde manner, as continuallyhe used to doe, thus he began.
3.  An honest plaine meaning man, (simply and conscionably)reprehended the malignity, hypocrisie, and misdemeanour of manyReligious persons.
4、  And yet his sight would lend me life a while:
5、  Perplexed with these various contradicting opinions, he waswilling divers times to turne home backe againe: yet such was theviolence of his love, and the power thereof prevailing against allsinister arguments; as he went to the grave, and removing theboordes covering it, whereinto he entred; and having despoiledScannadio of his garments, cloathed himselfe with them, and so laidhim down, having first covered the grave againe. Not long had heetarryed there, but he began to bethinke him, what manner of manScannadio was, and what strange reports had bene noised of him, notonely for ransacking dead mens graves in the night season, but manyother abhominable Villanies committed by him, which so fearfullyassaulted him; that his haire stoode on end, every member of himquaked, and every minute he imagined Scannadio rising, with intentto strangle him in the grave. But his fervent affection overcoming allthese idle feares, and lying stone still, as if he had beene thedead man indeede; he remained to see the end of his hope.

旧版特色

!

网友评论(kYwz2y7E34880))

  • 苗艳丽 08-03

      When Titus had thus concluded his Oration, he arose with a sterneand discontented countenance, and tooke Gisippus by the hand,plainly declaring, that he made small account of all the rest thatwere in the Temple; and shaking his head at them, rather menacedthen any other wise seemed to care for them.

  • 李敏军 08-03

      I have loved, and still doe love, Spinelloccio as my brother, butyesterday (albeit he knoweth it not) I found, the honest trust Ireposed in him, deserved no other, or better recompence, but even tobe bold with my wife, in the selfesame manner as I am, and as heeought to do with none but you. Now, in regard of the love which Ibeare him, I intend to be no otherwise revenged on him, but in thesame kinde as the offence was committed. He hath bin more thenfamiliar with my wife. I must borrow the selfe-same courtesie ofyou, which in equity you cannot deny mee, weighing the wrong youhave sustained by my wife. Our injuries are alike, in your Husbandto me, and in my wife to you: let then their punishment and ours bealike also; as they, so we; for in this case there can be no justerrevenge.The Woman hearing this, and perceiving the manifolde confirmationsthereof, protested (on solemne oath) by Zeppa; hir beliefe grewsetled, and thus she answered. My loving neighbor Zeppa, seeing thiskinde of revenge is (in meere justice) imposed on mee, and ordained asa due scourge, as well to the breach of friendship andneighbourhood, as abuse of his true and loyall wife: I am the morewilling to consent: alwaies provided, that it be no imbarrement oflove betweene your wife and mee, albeit I have good reason to alledge,that she began the quarrell first: and what I do is but to right mywrong, as any other woman of spirit would do: Afterwards, we may themore pardon one another. For breach more easi of peace (answeredZeppa) between my wife and you, take my honest word for yourwarrant. Moreover, in requitall of this favour to mee, I willbestowe a deare and precious jewell on you, excelling all the restwhich you have beside.

  • 苟日新 08-03

       The Ladies and Gentlemen also, having smiled sufficiently at theseverall accidents which did befall the poore Traveller Andrea,reported at large by Madam Fiammetta, the Lady Aimillia seeing hertale to be fully concluded, began (by commandement of the Queene) tospeak in this manner.

  • 杨勇刚 08-03

      Whereto the Jew replyed: I beleeve Jehannot that all which thou hastsaid, may be so. But, to make short with thee, I am fully determined(if thou wouldst have me a Christian, as thou instantly urgest me tobee) to goe thither, for otherwise, I will continue as I am.Jehannot perceyving his setled purpose, said: Goe then in Gods name.But perswaded himselfe, that hee would never become a Christian, afterhe had once seene the Court of Rome: neverthelesse, he counted hislabour not altogither lost, in regard he bestowed it to a good end,and honest intentions are to be commended.

  • 汤润清 08-02

    {  Peronella then saide to her husband. Seeing thou art come home soluckily, helpe me to lift up the Fat, that the man may come foorth,and then you two end the bargaine together. Striguario, who thogh hewas mewed up under the tubbe, had his eares open enough; and hearingthe witty excuse of Peronella, tooke himselfe free from futurefeare: and being come from under the Fat, pretending also, as if hehad herd nothing, nor saw Lazaro, looking round about him, said. Whereis this good woman? Lazaro stepping forth boldly like a man,replyed: Heere am I, what would you have Sir? Thou? quothStriguario, what art thou? I ask for the good wife, with whom I mademy match for the Fat. Honest Gentleman (answered Lazaro) I am thathonest Womans Husband, for lacke of a better, and I will maintainewhatsoever my Wife hath done.

  • 切斯·克劳福 08-01

      WHEREBY THE AUTHOR, APPROVING THE CHRISTIAN FAITH,}

  • 米哈伊-普罗霍洛夫 08-01

      As one repeated the words to another throughout the town, itbecame a familiar saying that the most acceptable of all services toGod is to put the Devil in Hell. The saying has crossed the sea andbecome current among us, as it still is.

  • 凯基 08-01

      According to the ancient Annales of the Cypriots, there sometimelived in Cyprus, a Noble Gentleman, who was commonly calledAristippus, and exceeded all other of the Country in the goods ofFortune. Divers children he had, but (amongst the rest) a Sonne, inwhose birth he was more infortunate then any of the rest; andcontinually greeved, in regard, that having all the compleateperfections of beauty, good forme, and manly parts, surpassing allother youths of his age or stature, yet hee wanted the reallornament of the soule, reason and judgement; being (indeed a meereIdeot or Foole,) and no better hope to be expected of him. His truename, according as he received it by Baptisme, was Galesus, butbecause neyther by the laborious paines of his Tutors indulgence,and faire endevour of his parents, or ingenuity of any other, he couldnot be brought to civility of life, understanding of Letters, orcommon carriage of a reasonable creature: by his grosse and deformedkinde of speech, his qualities also savouring rather of brutishbreeding, then any way derived from manly education; as an Epithite ofscorne and derision, generally, they gave him the name of Chynon,which in their native Countrey language, and divers other beside,signifieth a very Sot or Foole, and so was he termed by every one.

  • 王泽旭 07-31

       This Frederigo (as it is no rare matter in yong Gentlemen) becameenamored of a Gentlewoman, named Madam Giana, who was esteemed (in hertime) to be the fairest and most gracious Lady in all Florence. Inwhich respect, and to reach the height of his desire, he made manysumptuous Feasts and Banquets, joustes, Tilties, Tournaments, andall other noble actions of Armes, beside, sending her infinite richand costly presents, making spare of nothing, but lashing all out inlavish expence. Notwithstanding, she being no lesse honest then faire,made no reckoning of whatsoever he did for her sake, or the leastrespect of his owne person. So that Frederigo, spending thus dailymore, then his meanes and ability could maintaine, and no supplies anyway redounding to him, or his faculties (as very easily they might)diminished in such sort, that became so poore; as he had nothingleft him, but a small poore Farme to live upon, the silly reveneweswhereof were so meane, as scarcely allowed him meat and drinke; yethad he a faire Hawke or Faulcon, hardly any where to be fellowed, soexpeditious and sure she was of flight. His low ebbe and poverty, noway quailing his love to the Lady, but rather setting a keener edgethereon; he saw the City life could no longer containe him, where mosthe coveted to abide: and therefore, betooke himselfe to his pooreCountrey Farme, to let his Faulcon get him his dinner and supper,patiently supporting his penurious estate, without suite or meanesmaking to one, for helpe or reliefe in any such necessity.

  • 刘江 07-29

    {  And let none pitty her distresse,

  • 阿布 07-29

      When Gnats will mount to Eagles in the ayre,

提交评论