0 皇冠掌上365下载-APP安装下载

皇冠掌上365下载 注册最新版下载

皇冠掌上365下载 注册

皇冠掌上365下载注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:吴志毅 大小:BtoF3pRm48779KB 下载:gkCxTCU556993次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:ZFPCRN7138407条
日期:2020-08-05 06:54:19
安卓
汪小炎

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  As spoke he took Telemachus' spear, whereon he crossed the stonethreshold and came inside. Ulysses rose from his seat to give himplace as he entered, but Telemachus checked him; "Sit down, stranger."said he, "I can easily find another seat, and there is one here whowill lay it for me."
2.  And Ulysses answered, "Nurse, you ought not to speak in that way;I am well able to form my own opinion about one and all of them;hold your tongue and leave everything to heaven."
3.  Thus did they converse. Eurymachus then came up and said, "QueenPenelope, daughter of Icarius, if all the Achaeans in Iasian Argoscould see you at this moment, you would have still more suitors inyour house by tomorrow morning, for you are the most admirable womanin the whole world both as regards personal beauty and strength ofunderstanding."
4.  "Eumaeus, and all of you, to-morrow I want to go away and beginbegging about the town, so as to be no more trouble to you or toyour men. Give me your advice therefore, and let me have a goodguide to go with me and show me the way. I will go the round of thecity begging as I needs must, to see if any one will give me a drinkand a piece of bread. I should like also to go to the house of Ulyssesand bring news of her husband to queen Penelope. I could then go aboutamong the suitors and see if out of all their abundance they will giveme a dinner. I should soon make them an excellent servant in all sortsof ways. Listen and believe when I tell you that by the blessing ofMercury who gives grace and good name to the works of all men, thereis no one living who would make a more handy servant than I should- toput fresh wood on the fire, chop fuel, carve, cook, pour out wine, anddo all those services that poor men have to do for their betters."
5.  "Then they went away, and I laughed inwardly at the success of myclever stratagem, but the Cyclops, groaning and in an agony of pain,felt about with his hands till he found the stone and took it from thedoor; then he sat in the doorway and stretched his hands in front ofit to catch anyone going out with the sheep, for he thought I might befoolish enough to attempt this.
6.  "You are always taking something of that sort into your head,"replied Minerva, "and that is why I cannot desert you in yourafflictions; you are so plausible, shrewd and shifty. Any one butyourself on returning from so long a voyage would at once have gonehome to see his wife and children, but you do not seem to care aboutasking after them or hearing any news about them till you haveexploited your wife, who remains at home vainly grieving for you,and having no peace night or day for the tears she sheds on yourbehalf. As for my not coming near you, I was never uneasy about you,for I was certain you would get back safely though you would loseall your men, and I did not wish to quarrel with my uncle Neptune, whonever forgave you for having blinded his son. I will now, however,point out to you the lie of the land, and you will then perhapsbelieve me. This is the haven of the old merman Phorcys, and here isthe olive tree that grows at the head of it; [near it is the cavesacred to the Naiads;] here too is the overarching cavern in which youhave offered many an acceptable hecatomb to the nymphs, and this isthe wooded mountain Neritum."

计划指导

1.  "Then I saw Chloris, whom Neleus married for her beauty, havinggiven priceless presents for her. She was youngest daughter to Amphionson of Iasus and king of Minyan Orchomenus, and was Queen in Pylos.She bore Nestor, Chromius, and Periclymenus, and she also bore thatmarvellously lovely woman Pero, who was wooed by all the countryround; but Neleus would only give her to him who should raid thecattle of Iphicles from the grazing grounds of Phylace, and this was ahard task. The only man who would undertake to raid them was a certainexcellent seer, but the will of heaven was against him, for therangers of the cattle caught him and put him in prison; neverthelesswhen a full year had passed and the same season came round again,Iphicles set him at liberty, after he had expounded all the oracles ofheaven. Thus, then, was the will of Jove accomplished.
2.  "Nestor," said he, "son of Neleus, honour to the Achaean name, youask whence we come, and I will tell you. We come from Ithaca underNeritum, and the matter about which I would speak is of private notpublic import. I seek news of my unhappy father Ulysses, who is saidto have sacked the town of Troy in company with yourself. We know whatfate befell each one of the other heroes who fought at Troy, but asregards Ulysses heaven has hidden from us the knowledge even that heis dead at all, for no one can certify us in what place he perished,nor say whether he fell in battle on the mainland, or was lost atsea amid the waves of Amphitrite. Therefore I am suppliant at yourknees, if haply you may be pleased to tell me of his melancholy end,whether you saw it with your own eyes, or heard it from some othertraveller, for he was a man born to trouble. Do not soften thingsout of any pity for me, but tell me in all plainness exactly whatyou saw. If my brave father Ulysses ever did you loyal service, eitherby word or deed, when you Achaeans were harassed among the Trojans,bear it in mind now as in my favour and tell me truly all."
3.  This frightened Irus still more, but they brought him into themiddle of the court, and the two men raised their hands to fight. ThenUlysses considered whether he should let drive so hard at him as tomake an end of him then and there, or whether he should give him alighter blow that should only knock him down; in the end he deemedit best to give the lighter blow for fear the Achaeans should begin tosuspect who he was. Then they began to fight, and Irus hit Ulysseson the right shoulder; but Ulysses gave Irus a blow on the neckunder the ear that broke in the bones of his skull, and the blood camegushing out of his mouth; he fell groaning in the dust, gnashing histeeth and kicking on the ground, but the suitors threw up theirhands and nearly died of laughter, as Ulysses caught hold of him bythe foot and dragged him into the outer court as far as thegate-house. There he propped him up against the wall and put his staffin his hands. "Sit here," said he, "and keep the dogs and pigs off;you are a pitiful creature, and if you try to make yourself king ofthe beggars any more you shall fare still worse."
4.  On this he began chopping firewood, while the others brought in afine fat five year old boar pig, and set it at the altar. Eumaeusdid not forget the gods, for he was a man of good principles, so thefirst thing he did was to cut bristles from the pig's face and throwthem into the fire, praying to all the gods as he did so thatUlysses might return home again. Then he clubbed the pig with a billetof oak which he had kept back when he was chopping the firewood, andstunned it, while the others slaughtered and singed it. Then theycut it up, and Eumaeus began by putting raw pieces from each jointon to some of the fat; these he sprinkled with barley meal, and laidupon the embers; they cut the rest of the meat up small, put thepieces upon the spits and roasted them till they were done; whenthey had taken them off the spits they threw them on to the dresser ina heap. The swineherd, who was a most equitable man, then stood upto give every one his share. He made seven portions; one of these heset apart for Mercury the son of Maia and the nymphs, praying tothem as he did so; the others he dealt out to the men man by man. Hegave Ulysses some slices cut lengthways down the loin as a mark ofespecial honour, and Ulysses was much pleased. "I hope, Eumaeus," saidhe, "that Jove will be as well disposed towards you as I am, for therespect you are showing to an outcast like myself."
5.  "Nine days and nine nights did we sail, and on the tenth day ournative land showed on the horizon. We got so close in that we couldsee the stubble fires burning, and I, being then dead beat, fellinto a light sleep, for I had never let the rudder out of my ownhands, that we might get home the faster. On this the men fell totalking among themselves, and said I was bringing back gold and silverin the sack that Aeolus had given me. 'Bless my heart,' would one turnto his neighbour, saying, 'how this man gets honoured and makesfriends to whatever city or country he may go. See what fine prizes heis taking home from Troy, while we, who have travelled just as faras he has, come back with hands as empty as we set out with- and nowAeolus has given him ever so much more. Quick- let us see what itall is, and how much gold and silver there is in the sack he gavehim.'
6.  "Mother," answered Telemachus, "let the bard sing what he has a mindto; bards do not make the ills they sing of; it is Jove, not they, whomakes them, and who sends weal or woe upon mankind according to hisown good pleasure. This fellow means no harm by singing theill-fated return of the Danaans, for people always applaud thelatest songs most warmly. Make up your mind to it and bear it; Ulyssesis not the only man who never came back from Troy, but many anotherwent down as well as he. Go, then, within the house and busyyourself with your daily duties, your loom, your distaff, and theordering of your servants; for speech is man's matter, and mineabove all others- for it is I who am master here."

推荐功能

1.  But Ulysses, when he had taken it up and examined it all over,strung it as easily as a skilled bard strings a new peg of his lyreand makes the twisted gut fast at both ends. Then he took it in hisright hand to prove the string, and it sang sweetly under his touchlike the twittering of a swallow. The suitors were dismayed, andturned colour as they heard it; at that moment, moreover, Jovethundered loudly as a sign, and the heart of Ulysses rejoiced as heheard the omen that the son of scheming Saturn had sent him.
2.  Outside the gate of the outer court there is a large garden of aboutfour acres with a wall all round it. It is full of beautiful trees-pears, pomegranates, and the most delicious apples. There are lusciousfigs also, and olives in full growth. The fruits never rot nor failall the year round, neither winter nor summer, for the air is sosoft that a new crop ripens before the old has dropped. Pear growson pear, apple on apple, and fig on fig, and so also with thegrapes, for there is an excellent vineyard: on the level ground of apart of this, the grapes are being made into raisins; in anotherpart they are being gathered; some are being trodden in the wine tubs,others further on have shed their blossom and are beginning to showfruit, others again are just changing colour. In the furthest partof the ground there are beautifully arranged beds of flowers thatare in bloom all the year round. Two streams go through it, the oneturned in ducts throughout the whole garden, while the other iscarried under the ground of the outer court to the house itself, andthe town's people draw water from it. Such, then, were thesplendours with which the gods had endowed the house of king Alcinous.
3.  Then Eurymachus, son of Polybus, answered, "It rests with heavento decide who shall be chief among us, but you shall be master in yourown house and over your own possessions; no one while there is a manin Ithaca shall do you violence nor rob you. And now, my goodfellow, I want to know about this stranger. What country does hecome from? Of what family is he, and where is his estate? Has hebrought you news about the return of your father, or was he onbusiness of his own? He seemed a well-to-do man, but he hurried off sosuddenly that he was gone in a moment before we could get to knowhim."
4.  Irus was very angry and answered, "You filthy glutton, you run ontrippingly like an old fish-fag. I have a good mind to lay bothhands about you, and knock your teeth out of your head like so manyboar's tusks. Get ready, therefore, and let these people here stand byand look on. You will never be able to fight one who is so muchyounger than yourself."
5.   Then Telemachus said, "Eurymachus, and you other suitors, I shallsay no more, and entreat you no further, for the gods and the peopleof Ithaca now know my story. Give me, then, a ship and a crew oftwenty men to take me hither and thither, and I will go to Spartaand to Pylos in quest of my father who has so long been missing.Some one may tell me something, or (and people often hear things inthis way) some heaven-sent message may direct me. If I can hear of himas alive and on his way home I will put up with the waste yousuitors will make for yet another twelve months. If on the otherhand I hear of his death, I will return at once, celebrate his funeralrites with all due pomp, build a barrow to his memory, and make mymother marry again."
6.  'Son-in-law and daughter," replied Autolycus, "call the childthus: I am highly displeased with a large number of people in oneplace and another, both men and women; so name the child 'Ulysses,' orthe child of anger. When he grows up and comes to visit his mother'sfamily on Mount Parnassus, where my possessions lie, I will make him apresent and will send him on his way rejoicing."

应用

1.  With these words she came down from her upper room, not alone butattended by two of her maidens, and when she reached the suitors shestood by one of the bearing-posts supporting the roof of the cloister,holding a veil before her face, and with a staid maid servant oneither side of her. As they beheld her the suitors were so overpoweredand became so desperately enamoured of her, that each one prayed hemight win her for his own bed fellow.
2.  "For six days my men kept driving in the best cows and feasting uponthem, but when Jove the son of Saturn had added a seventh day, thefury of the gale abated; we therefore went on board, raised our masts,spread sail, and put out to sea. As soon as we were well away from theisland, and could see nothing but sky and sea, the son of Saturnraised a black cloud over our ship, and the sea grew dark beneathit. We not get on much further, for in another moment we were caughtby a terrific squall from the West that snapped the forestays of themast so that it fell aft, while all the ship's gear tumbled about atthe bottom of the vessel. The mast fell upon the head of thehelmsman in the ship's stern, so that the bones of his head werecrushed to pieces, and he fell overboard as though he were diving,with no more life left in him.
3.  "Then," said Penelope, "if you are a god or have been sent here bydivine commission, tell me also about that other unhappy one- is hestill alive, or is he already dead and in the house of Hades?"
4、  Then he sat down on the hearth among the ashes and they all heldtheir peace, till presently the old hero Echeneus, who was anexcellent speaker and an elder among the Phaeacians, plainly and inall honesty addressed them thus:
5、  As he spoke he drew his rags aside from the great scar, and whenthey had examined it thoroughly, they both of them wept about Ulysses,threw their arms round him and kissed his head and shoulders, whileUlysses kissed their hands and faces in return. The sun would havegone down upon their mourning if Ulysses had not checked them andsaid:

旧版特色

!

网友评论(amQPvS5z76474))

  • 董双良 08-04

      "Father," replied Telemachus, "you will come to know me by and by,and when you do you will find that I can keep your counsel. I do notthink, however, the plan you propose will turn out well for eitherof us. Think it over. It will take us a long time to go the round ofthe farms and exploit the men, and all the time the suitors will bewasting your estate with impunity and without compunction. Prove thewomen by all means, to see who are disloyal and who guiltless, but Iam not in favour of going round and trying the men. We can attend tothat later on, if you really have some sign from Jove that he willsupport you."

  • 张玉玺 08-04

      Then Ulysses answered, "Madam, wife of Ulysses, do not disfigureyourself further by grieving thus bitterly for your loss, though I canhardly blame you for doing so. A woman who has loved her husband andborne him children, would naturally be grieved at losing him, eventhough he were a worse man than Ulysses, who they say was like agod. Still, cease your tears and listen to what I can tell I will hidenothing from you, and can say with perfect truth that I have latelyheard of Ulysses as being alive and on his way home; he is among theThesprotians, and is bringing back much valuable treasure that hehas begged from one and another of them; but his ship and all his crewwere lost as they were leaving the Thrinacian island, for Jove and thesun-god were angry with him because his men had slaughtered thesun-god's cattle, and they were all drowned to a man. But Ulyssesstuck to the keel of the ship and was drifted on to the land of thePhaecians, who are near of kin to the immortals, and who treated himas though he had been a god, giving him many presents, and wishingto escort him home safe and sound. In fact Ulysses would have beenhere long ago, had he not thought better to go from land to landgathering wealth; for there is no man living who is so wily as heis; there is no one can compare with him. Pheidon king of theThesprotians told me all this, and he swore to me- makingdrink-offerings in his house as he did so- that the ship was by thewater side and the crew found who would take Ulysses to his owncountry. He sent me off first, for there happened to be aThesprotian ship sailing for the wheat-growing island of Dulichium,but he showed me all treasure Ulysses had got together, and he hadenough lying in the house of king Pheidon to keep his family for tengenerations; but the king said Ulysses had gone to Dodona that hemight learn Jove's mind from the high oak tree, and know whether afterso long an absence he should return to Ithaca openly or in secret.So you may know he is safe and will be here shortly; he is close athand and cannot remain away from home much longer; nevertheless I willconfirm my words with an oath, and call Jove who is the first andmightiest of all gods to witness, as also that hearth of Ulysses towhich I have now come, that all I have spoken shall surely come topass. Ulysses will return in this self same year; with the end of thismoon and the beginning of the next he will be here."

  • 布雷斯特-利特弗斯克 08-04

       "Thus they talked and evil counsels prevailed. They loosed the sack,whereupon the wind flew howling forth and raised a storm thatcarried us weeping out to sea and away from our own country. Then Iawoke, and knew not whether to throw myself into the sea or to live onand make the best of it; but I bore it, covered myself up, and laydown in the ship, while the men lamented bitterly as the fiercewinds bore our fleet back to the Aeolian island.

  • 冯导练 08-04

      "Hear me, men of Ithaca, and I speak more particularly to thesuitors, for I see mischief brewing for them. Ulysses is not goingto be away much longer; indeed he is close at hand to deal out deathand destruction, not on them alone, but on many another of us who livein Ithaca. Let us then be wise in time, and put a stop to thiswickedness before he comes. Let the suitors do so of their own accord;it will be better for them, for I am not prophesying without dueknowledge; everything has happened to Ulysses as I foretold when theArgives set out for Troy, and he with them. I said that after goingthrough much hardship and losing all his men he should come home againin the twentieth year and that no one would know him; and now all thisis coming true."

  • 兰晓辉 08-03

    {  "You are quite right, Laodamas," replied Euryalus, "go up to yourguest and speak to him about it yourself."

  • 黄敬 08-02

      "Fear not, nurse," answered Telemachus, "my scheme is not withoutheaven's sanction; but swear that you will say nothing about allthis to my mother, till I have been away some ten or twelve days,unless she hears of my having gone, and asks you; for I do not wanther to spoil her beauty by crying."}

  • 许婧 08-02

      "Thus he spoke, and the Achaeans feared no more. The daughters ofthe old man of the sea stood round you weeping bitterly, and clothedyou in immortal raiment. The nine muses also came and lifted uptheir sweet voices in lament- calling and answering one another; therewas not an Argive but wept for pity of the dirge they chaunted. Daysand nights seven and ten we mourned you, mortals and immortals, but onthe eighteenth day we gave you to the flames, and many a fat sheepwith many an ox did we slay in sacrifice around you. You were burnt inraiment of the gods, with rich resins and with honey, while heroes,horse and foot, clashed their armour round the pile as you wereburning, with the tramp as of a great multitude. But when the flamesof heaven had done their work, we gathered your white bones atdaybreak and laid them in ointments and in pure wine. Your motherbrought us a golden vase to hold them- gift of Bacchus, and work ofVulcan himself; in this we mingled your bleached bones with those ofPatroclus who had gone before you, and separate we enclosed also thoseof Antilochus, who had been closer to you than any other of yourcomrades now that Patroclus was no more.

  • 泰森 08-02

      "Those who have seen us both," answered Ulysses, "have always saidwe were wonderfully like each other, and now you have noticed it too.

  • 邢进 08-01

       As he spoke the sun set and it came on dark, whereon Minerva said,"Sir, all that you have said is well; now, however, order thetongues of the victims to be cut, and mix wine that we may makedrink-offerings to Neptune, and the other immortals, and then go tobed, for it is bed time. People should go away early and not keep latehours at a religious festival."

  • 谢启东 07-30

    {  As she spoke the goddess dispersed the mist and the land appeared.Then Ulysses rejoiced at finding himself again in his own land, andkissed the bounteous soil; he lifted up his hands and prayed to thenymphs, saying, "Naiad nymphs, daughters of Jove, I made sure that Iwas never again to see you, now therefore I greet you with allloving salutations, and I will bring you offerings as in the old days,if Jove's redoubtable daughter will grant me life, and bring my son tomanhood."

  • 贾万征 07-30

      "'This,' I answered, 'must be as it may please heaven, but tell meand tell me and tell me true, I see my poor mother's ghost close byus; she is sitting by the blood without saying a word, and though I amher own son she does not remember me and speak to me; tell me, Sir,how I can make her know me.'

提交评论