0 宝盈娱乐场-APP安装下载

宝盈娱乐场 注册最新版下载

宝盈娱乐场 注册

宝盈娱乐场注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:张广智 大小:OCRV68nn16924KB 下载:2DspqPmX65879次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:YEGr5YPB95903条
日期:2020-08-04 20:05:41
安卓
契诃夫

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  They did as they were told, and set food before Ulysses, who ate anddrank ravenously, for it was long since he had had food of any kind.Meanwhile, Nausicaa bethought her of another matter. She got the linenfolded and placed in the waggon, she then yoked the mules, and, as shetook her seat, she called Ulysses:
2.  Here poor Ulysses would have certainly perished even in spite of hisown destiny, if Minerva had not helped him to keep his wits about him.He swam seaward again, beyond reach of the surf that was beatingagainst the land, and at the same time he kept looking towards theshore to see if he could find some haven, or a spit that should takethe waves aslant. By and by, as he swam on, he came to the mouth ofa river, and here he thought would be the best place, for there wereno rocks, and it afforded shelter from the wind. He felt that therewas a current, so he prayed inwardly and said:
3.  But Pisistratus said, "No matter what hurry we are in we cannotdrive in the dark. It will be morning soon; wait till Menelaus hasbrought his presents and put them in the chariot for us; and let himsay good-bye to us in the usual way. So long as he lives a guestshould never forget a host who has shown him kindness."
4.  With these words he moved the heart of Penelope. Then Theoclymenussaid to her:
5.  THEN Mercury of Cyllene summoned the ghosts of the suitors, and inhis hand he held the fair golden wand with which he seals men's eyesin sleep or wakes them just as he pleases; with this he roused theghosts and led them, while they followed whining and gibberingbehind him. As bats fly squealing in the hollow of some great cave,when one of them has fallen out of the cluster in which they hang,even so did the ghosts whine and squeal as Mercury the healer ofsorrow led them down into the dark abode of death. When they hadpassed the waters of Oceanus and the rock Leucas, they came to thegates of the sun and the land of dreams, whereon they reached themeadow of asphodel where dwell the souls and shadows of them thatcan labour no more.
6.  "Thus he spoke, and the Achaeans feared no more. The daughters ofthe old man of the sea stood round you weeping bitterly, and clothedyou in immortal raiment. The nine muses also came and lifted uptheir sweet voices in lament- calling and answering one another; therewas not an Argive but wept for pity of the dirge they chaunted. Daysand nights seven and ten we mourned you, mortals and immortals, but onthe eighteenth day we gave you to the flames, and many a fat sheepwith many an ox did we slay in sacrifice around you. You were burnt inraiment of the gods, with rich resins and with honey, while heroes,horse and foot, clashed their armour round the pile as you wereburning, with the tramp as of a great multitude. But when the flamesof heaven had done their work, we gathered your white bones atdaybreak and laid them in ointments and in pure wine. Your motherbrought us a golden vase to hold them- gift of Bacchus, and work ofVulcan himself; in this we mingled your bleached bones with those ofPatroclus who had gone before you, and separate we enclosed also thoseof Antilochus, who had been closer to you than any other of yourcomrades now that Patroclus was no more.

计划指导

1.  "Then I saw Phaedra, and Procris, and fair Ariadne daughter of themagician Minos, whom Theseus was carrying off from Crete to Athens,but he did not enjoy her, for before he could do so Diana killed herin the island of Dia on account of what Bacchus had said against her.
2.  He counted his goodly coppers and cauldrons, his gold and all hisclothes, but there was nothing missing; still he kept grieving aboutnot being in his own country, and wandered up and down by the shore ofthe sounding sea bewailing his hard fate. Then Minerva came up tohim disguised as a young shepherd of delicate and princely mien,with a good cloak folded double about her shoulders; she had sandalson her comely feet and held a javelin in her hand. Ulysses was gladwhen he saw her, and went straight up to her.
3.  "Those whom you have named," answered Telemachus, "are a couple ofgood allies, for though they dwell high up among the clouds theyhave power over both gods and men."
4.  "Madam," answered Ulysses, "it is such a long time ago that I canhardly say. Twenty years are come and gone since he left my home,and went elsewhither; but I will tell you as well as I canrecollect. Ulysses wore a mantle of purple wool, double lined, andit was fastened by a gold brooch with two catches for the pin. Onthe face of this there was a device that showed a dog holding aspotted fawn between his fore paws, and watching it as it laypanting upon the ground. Every one marvelled at the way in which thesethings had been done in gold, the dog looking at the fawn, andstrangling it, while the fawn was struggling convulsively to escape.As for the shirt that he wore next his skin, it was so soft that itfitted him like the skin of an onion, and glistened in the sunlight tothe admiration of all the women who beheld it. Furthermore I say,and lay my saying to your heart, that I do not know whether Ulysseswore these clothes when he left home, or whether one of his companionshad given them to him while he was on his voyage; or possibly some oneat whose house he was staying made him a present of them, for he was aman of many friends and had few equals among the Achaeans. I myselfgave him a sword of bronze and a beautiful purple mantle, doublelined, with a shirt that went down to his feet, and I sent him onboard his ship with every mark of honour. He had a servant with him, alittle older than himself, and I can tell you what he was like; hisshoulders were hunched, he was dark, and he had thick curly hair.His name was Eurybates, and Ulysses treated him with greaterfamiliarity than he did any of the others, as being the mostlike-minded with himself."
5.  "On this I took comfort in spite of all my sorrow, and said, 'Iknow, then, about these two; tell me, therefore, about the third manof whom you spoke; is he still alive, but at sea, and unable to gethome? or is he dead? Tell me, no matter how much it may grieve me.'
6.  "Their hearts sank as they heard me, for they remembered how theyhad been treated by the Laestrygonian Antiphates, and by the savageogre Polyphemus. They wept bitterly in their dismay, but there wasnothing to be got by crying, so I divided them into two companiesand set a captain over each; I gave one company to Eurylochus, while Itook command of the other myself. Then we cast lots in a helmet, andthe lot fell upon Eurylochus; so he set out with his twenty-two men,and they wept, as also did we who were left behind.

推荐功能

1.  BOOK VIII.
2.  Calypso smiled at this and caressed him with her hand: "You know agreat deal," said she, "but you are quite wrong here. May heaven aboveand earth below be my witnesses, with the waters of the river Styx-and this is the most solemn oath which a blessed god can take- thatI mean you no sort of harm, and am only advising you to do exactlywhat I should do myself in your place. I am dealing with you quitestraightforwardly; my heart is not made of iron, and I am very sorryfor you."
3.  Thus did they converse. Eurymachus then came up and said, "QueenPenelope, daughter of Icarius, if all the Achaeans in Iasian Argoscould see you at this moment, you would have still more suitors inyour house by tomorrow morning, for you are the most admirable womanin the whole world both as regards personal beauty and strength ofunderstanding."
4.  He found her at home. There was a large fire burning on thehearth, and one could smell from far the fragrant reek of burningcedar and sandal wood. As for herself, she was busy at her loom,shooting her golden shuttle through the warp and singingbeautifully. Round her cave there was a thick wood of alder, poplar,and sweet smelling cypress trees, wherein all kinds of great birds hadbuilt their nests- owls, hawks, and chattering sea-crows that occupytheir business in the waters. A vine loaded with grapes was trainedand grew luxuriantly about the mouth of the cave; there were also fourrunning rills of water in channels cut pretty close together, andturned hither and thither so as to irrigate the beds of violets andluscious herbage over which they flowed. Even a god could not helpbeing charmed with such a lovely spot, so Mercury stood still andlooked at it; but when he had admired it sufficiently he went insidethe cave.
5.   Minerva led the way and Telemachus followed her. Presently she said,"Telemachus, you must not be in the least shy or nervous; you havetaken this voyage to try and find out where your father is buriedand how he came by his end; so go straight up to Nestor that we maysee what he has got to tell us. Beg of him to speak the truth, andhe will tell no lies, for he is an excellent person."
6.  "And a pretty figure I should cut then," replied Eumaeus, both nowand hereafter, if I were to kill you after receiving you into my hutand showing you hospitality. I should have to say my prayers in goodearnest if I did; but it is just supper time and I hope my men willcome in directly, that we may cook something savoury for supper."

应用

1.  "Therefore, Sir, do you on your part affect no more concealmentnor reserve in the matter about which I shall ask you; it will be morepolite in you to give me a plain answer; tell me the name by whichyour father and mother over yonder used to call you, and by whichyou were known among your neighbours and fellow-citizens. There isno one, neither rich nor poor, who is absolutely without any namewhatever, for people's fathers and mothers give them names as soonas they are born. Tell me also your country, nation, and city, thatour ships may shape their purpose accordingly and take you there.For the Phaeacians have no pilots; their vessels have no rudders asthose of other nations have, but the ships themselves understandwhat it is that we are thinking about and want; they know all thecities and countries in the whole world, and can traverse the sea justas well even when it is covered with mist and cloud, so that thereis no danger of being wrecked or coming to any harm. Still I doremember hearing my father say that Neptune was angry with us forbeing too easy-going in the matter of giving people escorts. He saidthat one of these days he should wreck a ship of ours as it wasreturning from having escorted some one, and bury our city under ahigh mountain. This is what my used to say, but whether the god willcarry out his threat or no is a matter which he will decide forhimself.
2.  Thereon he gathered his clouds together, grasped his trident,stirred it round in the sea, and roused the rage of every wind thatblows till earth, sea, and sky were hidden in cloud, and nightsprang forth out of the heavens. Winds from East, South, North, andWest fell upon him all at the same time, and a tremendous sea gotup, so that Ulysses' heart began to fail him. "Alas," he said tohimself in his dismay, "what ever will become of me? I am afraidCalypso was right when she said I should have trouble by sea beforeI got back home. It is all coming true. How black is Jove makingheaven with his clouds, and what a sea the winds are raising fromevery quarter at once. I am now safe to perish. Blest and thrice blestwere those Danaans who fell before Troy in the cause of the sons ofAtreus. Would that had been killed on the day when the Trojans werepressing me so sorely about the dead body of Achilles, for then Ishould have had due burial and the Achaeans would have honoured myname; but now it seems that I shall come to a most pitiable end."
3.  "Thus did he pray, and Neptune heard his prayer. Then he picked up arock much larger than the first, swung it aloft and hurled it withprodigious force. It fell just short of the ship, but was within alittle of hitting the end of the rudder. The sea quaked as the rockfell into it, and the wash of the wave it raised drove us onwards onour way towards the shore of the island.
4、  As she spoke she looked towards Penelope, as though wanting totell her that her dear husband was in the house, but Penelope wasunable to look in that direction and observe what was going on, forMinerva had diverted her attention; so Ulysses caught Euryclea bythe throat with his right hand and with his left drew her close tohim, and said, "Nurse, do you wish to be the ruin of me, you whonursed me at your own breast, now that after twenty years of wanderingI am at last come to my own home again? Since it has been borne inupon you by heaven to recognize me, hold your tongue, and do not say aword about it any one else in the house, for if you do I tell you- andit shall surely be- that if heaven grants me to take the lives ofthese suitors, I will not spare you, though you are my own nurse, whenI am killing the other women."
5、  "'Say not a word,' he answered, 'in death's favour; I would ratherbe a paid servant in a poor man's house and be above ground thanking of kings among the dead. But give me news about son; is he goneto the wars and will he be a great soldier, or is this not so? Tell mealso if you have heard anything about my father Peleus- does hestill rule among the Myrmidons, or do they show him no respectthroughout Hellas and Phthia now that he is old and his limbs failhim? Could I but stand by his side, in the light of day, with the samestrength that I had when I killed the bravest of our foes upon theplain of Troy- could I but be as I then was and go even for a shorttime to my father's house, any one who tried to do him violence orsupersede him would soon me it.'

旧版特色

!

网友评论(c1K2XyiP67512))

  • 叶萌茗 08-03

      "Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, so you would start home to yourown land at once? Good luck go with you, but if you could only knowhow much suffering is in store for you before you get back to your owncountry, you would stay where you are, keep house along with me, andlet me make you immortal, no matter how anxious you may be to see thiswife of yours, of whom you are thinking all the time day after day;yet I flatter myself that at am no whit less tall or well-looking thanshe is, for it is not to be expected that a mortal woman shouldcompare in beauty with an immortal."

  • 克里斯·迈克尔 08-03

      "'My friends,' said I, 'we have meat and drink in the ship, let usmind, therefore, and not touch the cattle, or we shall suffer forit; for these cattle and sheep belong to the mighty sun, who seesand gives ear to everything. And again they promised that they wouldobey.

  • 梁阳 08-03

       So saying he made a ship's cable fast to one of the bearing-poststhat supported the roof of the domed room, and secured it all aroundthe building, at a good height, lest any of the women's feet shouldtouch the ground; and as thrushes or doves beat against a net that hasbeen set for them in a thicket just as they were getting to theirnest, and a terrible fate awaits them, even so did the women have toput their heads in nooses one after the other and die mostmiserably. Their feet moved convulsively for a while, but not for verylong.

  • 胡邦明 08-03

      "He got more and more furious as he heard me, so he tore the topfrom off a high mountain, and flung it just in front of my ship sothat it was within a little of hitting the end of the rudder. Thesea quaked as the rock fell into it, and the wash of the wave itraised carried us back towards the mainland, and forced us towards theshore. But I snatched up a long pole and kept the ship off, makingsigns to my men by nodding my head, that they must row for theirlives, whereon they laid out with a will. When we had got twice as faras we were before, I was for jeering at the Cyclops again, but the menbegged and prayed of me to hold my tongue.

  • 王照 08-02

    {  He led the way as he spoke, and Minerva followed him. When they werewithin he took her spear and set it in the spear- stand against astrong bearing-post along with the many other spears of his unhappyfather, and he conducted her to a richly decorated seat under which hethrew a cloth of damask. There was a footstool also for her feet,and he set another seat near her for himself, away from the suitors,that she might not be annoyed while eating by their noise andinsolence, and that he might ask her more freely about his father.

  • 安石 08-01

      "And now, tell me and tell me true. Where have you been wandering,and in what countries have you travelled? Tell us of the peoplesthemselves, and of their cities- who were hostile, savage anduncivilized, and who, on the other hand, hospitable and humane. Tellus also why you are made unhappy on hearing about the return of theArgive Danaans from Troy. The gods arranged all this, and sent themtheir misfortunes in order that future generations might havesomething to sing about. Did you lose some brave kinsman of yourwife's when you were before Troy? a son-in-law or father-in-law- whichare the nearest relations a man has outside his own flesh and blood?or was it some brave and kindly-natured comrade- for a good friendis as dear to a man as his own brother?"}

  • 路伟才 08-01

      "Nine days and nine nights did we sail, and on the tenth day ournative land showed on the horizon. We got so close in that we couldsee the stubble fires burning, and I, being then dead beat, fellinto a light sleep, for I had never let the rudder out of my ownhands, that we might get home the faster. On this the men fell totalking among themselves, and said I was bringing back gold and silverin the sack that Aeolus had given me. 'Bless my heart,' would one turnto his neighbour, saying, 'how this man gets honoured and makesfriends to whatever city or country he may go. See what fine prizes heis taking home from Troy, while we, who have travelled just as faras he has, come back with hands as empty as we set out with- and nowAeolus has given him ever so much more. Quick- let us see what itall is, and how much gold and silver there is in the sack he gavehim.'

  • 郭田勇 08-01

      Into this harbour, then, they took their ship, for they knew theplace, She had so much way upon her that she ran half her own lengthon to the shore; when, however, they had landed, the first thingthey did was to lift Ulysses with his rug and linen sheet out of theship, and lay him down upon the sand still fast asleep. Then they tookout the presents which Minerva had persuaded the Phaeacians to givehim when he was setting out on his voyage homewards. They put theseall together by the root of the olive tree, away from the road, forfear some passer by might come and steal them before Ulysses awoke;and then they made the best of their way home again.

  • 王勇超 07-31

       Then the other maids in the house rose and lit the fire on thehearth; Telemachus also rose and put on his clothes. He girded hissword about his shoulder, bound his sandals on his comely feet, andtook a doughty spear with a point of sharpened bronze; then he went tothe threshold of the cloister and said to Euryclea, "Nurse, did youmake the stranger comfortable both as regards bed and board, or didyou let him shift for himself?- for my mother, good woman though sheis, has a way of paying great attention to second-rate people, andof neglecting others who are in reality much better men."

  • 赵之珩 07-29

    {  They all held their peace till at last Agelaus son of Damastor said,"No one should take offence at what has just been said, nor gainsayit, for it is quite reasonable. Leave off, therefore, ill-treating thestranger, or any one else of the servants who are about the house; Iwould say, however, a friendly word to Telemachus and his mother,which I trust may commend itself to both. 'As long,' I would say,'as you had ground for hoping that Ulysses would one day come home, noone could complain of your waiting and suffering the suitors to bein your house. It would have been better that he should have returned,but it is now sufficiently clear that he will never do so; thereforetalk all this quietly over with your mother, and tell her to marry thebest man, and the one who makes her the most advantageous offer.Thus you will yourself be able to manage your own inheritance, andto eat and drink in peace, while your mother will look after someother man's house, not yours."'

  • 易拉宝 07-29

      "With this I left the ship and went up inland. When I got throughthe charmed grove, and was near the great house of the enchantressCirce, I met Mercury with his golden wand, disguised as a young man inthe hey-day of his youth and beauty with the down just coming upon hisface. He came up to me and took my hand within his own, saying, 'Mypoor unhappy man, whither are you going over this mountain top,alone and without knowing the way? Your men are shut up in Circe'spigsties, like so many wild boars in their lairs. You surely do notfancy that you can set them free? I can tell you that you will neverget back and will have to stay there with the rest of them. Butnever mind, I will protect you and get you out of your difficulty.Take this herb, which is one of great virtue, and keep it about youwhen you go to Circe's house, it will be a talisman to you againstevery kind of mischief.

提交评论